Stress Management

"How to Deal With All the Negativity on the News" Review

If you've been stressed or down on yourself, it may be time for a personal check-in. The negativity that surrounds you may be seeping into your unconscious. Check out Kate Cummins' suggestions for how to deal with this overbearing challenge (from the article How to Deal With All the Negativity on the News).

1. Check Your Emotions Regularly


News stations purposely engage you through emotional content. For them it’s just business. But unfortunately, negative news has the ability to keep you engaged without fully realizing how the information makes you feel.

So observe your news-watching habits. As you view local stations, do you pay attention to the way you connect to the information? Do you ever flip through channels and stop to watch a story that you never expected to be interested in seeing? Some content makes your heart race, holds your attention and keeps you engaged in the story, while other content fills you with anger or sorrow.

Then observe how your body reacts to the news you’re watching. Do you feel your heart racing? Do you feel your stomach twist with nerves or feel the weight of sadness coming over you? These bodily symptoms are connected with negative emotions, and they are called somatic symptoms. They engage your sympathetic nervous system (the part of your body that runs in attack mode) and can mimic anxiety.

So the next time you’re watching the nightly news or scrolling through stories on your go-to news site, check your body and feelings. If the information is making you stressed, turn it off. Get away. Detach. Knowing your limit of information flow will help decrease your connection to unhealthy emotions and keep you in control of your mental health.

2. Change Your Environment


Do you pay attention to where you get your news? Do you watch the morning edition while getting ready for work? Tune in at night while making dinner for your family? Or do you do one last check of Facebook/Twitter before you go to bed?

Negative information has the ability to wrangle its way into your long-term memories and means you’re likely to connect negative emotions to the place where you view the sad stories. Paying attention to where you watch news and limiting the environment can help you stay positive.

Think about it this way: Would you invite someone to sit on your couch if he or she told horrific stories the entire time? Probably not. As human beings, we need a place to detach from the world.

You work hard to create a peaceful living space and to make your house a home. Try to only watch the news on the bus, in your office or some other neutral location. Or bring your computer to a coffee shop and limit your news searching to certain spaces, so you can be free of negativity in your own space.

3. Talk About What You See, and Let It Go


It may seem counterintuitive to talk about the sad or horrifying stories you see on the news, but it can actually help you put them out of your mind. Do you have someone you feel safe talking about tragedy with? It’s important to engage in conversation with people you trust. Getting emotional information out in the open can release it from becoming internalized worry and concern.

There are also many community resources that you can use to discuss concerns and take action. For example, social-media groups and meetup events in the community are geared toward specific audiences. You can find like-minded people in these groups that may help you discuss the world around you.

Always make sure you have someone available to lend you an ear about negative information. If you can, find someone who will help encourage you out of the depression and anxiety that can arise from sad stories.

4. Be Aware of What Others Around You Are Saying


Social media has become a main source of connection in our world. However, it can also be a place of negative content. Do you find yourself cringing when a specific person’s posts pop up? Do your friends post a lot of negative information? If you’re surrounding yourself with people posting stories that are bringing you down, it may feel almost impossible to find positivity in life.

Sometimes the best remedy is disconnecting from social media. Don’t feel bad for unfollowing pessimistic people. Your social network, via online or in person, has to be a source of encouragement. Find stories that make you feel good. Most news sources have positive highlight stories in certain sections of their websites. Search for hero stories and you’ll find yourself in a better place emotionally.

5. Go Do Something to Change Your Tune


One of the biggest problem with disheartening news stories is that most of the time it seems like there’s nothing one person can do to change it. And that can make you feel like things are out of your control.

The best way to combat internal sadness is to do something good in your community. Turn off the television, get online and find an organization that compels you to get involved. Buy a meal for someone in need. Volunteer at a place that could use your help.

Behavioral activation increases your feelings of hope. And hopelessness is directly linked to depression. If you’re able to increase your ability to change something small in your environment, you will increase feelings of hopefulness. The world needs you to do great things. Go volunteer with your family or friends and get moving!

How do you deal with negativity? This topic is definitely worth reflection. You may also want to read "99 Ways to Redefine Yourself Today" for more life-changing inspiration.

Picture Credit: Livestrong.com-How do you think the "news" is really making you feel about yourself and the world?

More to Read:
Are you having trouble losing weight? Read "The 50 Best Weight-Loss Tips From 2015 " Review. This list helped my personal training clients in 2015 and will help you today.

Article Credit:
Author: Michael Moody Fitness with excerpt sourced from the article " How to Deal With All the Negativity on the News " on Livestrong.com.
"How to Deal With All the Negativity on the News" Review
Learn how to lose weight from a personal trainer in Chicago.
 
Transform your life with Michael's  self-help book   Redefine Yourself here !


Transform your life with Michael's self-help book Redefine Yourself here!

 

7 ways to improve your mood in less than 5 minutes

Some days staying positive and upbeat can feel like an uphill battle. Maybe it was a stressful day at work, a fight with a friend, or even just an off day — whatever it is, there are definitely things you can do to improve your mood.

And it's no wonder bad moods can sneak up on us so often. According to psychologist Guy Winch, author of the book Emotional First Aid: Healing Rejection, Guilt, Failure, and Other Everyday Hurts, a bad mood can be caused by anything from guilt over forgetting someone's birthday, to outstanding tasks on our to do list, to not getting enough likes on a personal or important Facebook share. Basically, humans are sensitive creatures, and it's not abnormal or even uncommon for little things to get us in a funk.

What's more, according to a psychology study featured on ABC News, while a portion of our individual happiness is pre-determined by genetics and circumstance, research shows that up to 40 percent can be controlled through our daily thoughts and actions.

This means that there are definitely a number of proactive things we can do when we start feeling ourselves getting down. If you're looking for ways to turn a bad mood around, here are seven ways to improve your mood in less than ten minutes.

1. Listen To Upbeat Music


According to a 2013 study published by the University of Missouri, listening to upbeat music can actually improve your mood. The study's author, Yuna Ferguson, noted that it's important not to overthink, "Am I happy yet?" while listening, and instead just allow yourself to enjoy the experience. So don't be afraid to turn up the jams when you're feeling low.

2. Get A Good Laugh


According to an article on Prevention, a study conducted by Stanford University showed that laughter increases dopamine in our brains, which is a chemical that elevates mood. And according to the Mayo Clinic, laughter also increases oxygen to our bodies and cools down our stress response system, resulting in a positive, relaxed feeling. So the next time you're in a bad mood, try pulling up some Amy Schumer or an SNL digital short on YouTube — you'll probably feel a lot better!

3. Walk Around The Block


Daniel Kripke, M.D. at the University of California said that, "Studies show that people who get more light exposure during the day have fewer sleep problems and less depression, and evidence suggests that light can keep you alert and productive." Additionally, mental health and exercise expert Jack Raglin, Ph.D., says that, "Studies have shown that even mild exercise, about 40 percent of your max heart rate, can lift your mood," and recommendsdoing activities that match your mood instead of trying to force yourself to do something you're just not feeling — like working in your garden instead of going to a loud Zumba class.

4. Declutter


Author of The Highly Sensitive Person, Elaine Aron, Ph.D., said that "clutter is a reminder of things that should be getting done, but aren't," and can help fuel feelings of failure, and mentioned that you don't have to spend an entire day reorganizing to feel better, as "just the illusion of order is enough to ease the mind." Aron recommended just putting things into neater stacks and piles for an instant boost in mood.

5. Give Someone A Hug


Tiffany Field, head researcher at The University of Miami's Touch Institute, said in an article in Psychology Today that, "when you stimulate the pressure receptors in the skin, you lower stress hormones," and also that touching others stimulates oxytocin, which also has positive effects on our mood. Field also recommended rubbing your own forehead, hands, and neck, as self-massage has been shown to decrease heart rate and reduce the stress-hormone cortisol in our systems.

6. Think About What Went Well


In another article in Psychology Today, doctor and wellness expert Susan Biali, M.D., said to reflect on three things that are going well or three positive moments in your day, and even replay them in your mind. According to Biali, that mentally revisiting these moments will help bring back the good mood and feelings they initially created.

7. Allow Yourself To Vent


Psychology Today contributor and psychologist Leon F. Seltzer, Ph.D., said there are actually some advantages to venting about a problem to a friend, and helping with your mood is one of them. "In many (though not all) situations it’s better for you to discharge negative emotions than to keep them bottled up inside," he says, and also that, "venting helps restore your equilibrium." So while you don't want to be the person at home or work who is always focusing on the negative, there is definitely a time and a place — not to mention a therapeutic reason — to vent when needed.

There's no reason a bad mood should ruin your day — or even a portion of your day. Often times when we're down about something at work or a minor interpersonal conflict, a quick boost is definitely within your grasp; you just need a conscious desire to feel better and a willingness to take a few mindful steps towards it.

And if you're finding that your bad or low moods are lasting longer than they should, or as if you can't seem to shake them, never be afraid to reach out to a professional. You can visitMentalhealth.gov or StrengthOfUs.org for information on how to get help in your area.

****If you ever need more weight loss tips, never hesitate to send Michael an email (michael@michaelmoodyfitness.com). He is a personal trainer in Chicago and has been serving weight loss personal training clients since 2005.

Picture Credit: organicalifestyle.com


Article Credit:
Author: Bustle at Business Insider
7 ways to improve your mood in less than 5 minutes
Improving your mood while personal training in Chicago.