River North Personal Trainer

"7 Weird Reasons You're Gaining Weight" Review

Have you tried everything and you still can't lose weight? The reason might be outside of your plate. Here are 7 weird reasons why you are struggling (from the article 7 Weird Reasons You're Gaining Weight).

You're depressed


Many anti-depressant medications cause weight gain—so if you're depressed and taking pills for it, expect to see a bump in weight between 5 and 15 pounds, with continued gradual accumulation over the years, says Dr. Hedaya, who is also the founder of the National Center for Whole Psychiatry in Chevy Chase, MD.

If you're not taking pills, there’s evidence that feelings of depression can correlate to weight gain. One 2010 study published in the American Journal of Public Health found that people who feel sad and lonely gain weight more quickly than those who report fewer depression-related symptoms. "They may be eating more high-fat, high-calorie comfort foods," says Belinda Needham, PhD, assistant professor in the department of sociology at UAB and the lead author of the study. "Or they may have [cut back their] physical activity."

Fix it: "If I see patients who are taking anti-depressants and that could be the culprit of their weight gain, I may wean them slowly off of the drug," says Dominique Fradin-Read, MD, MPH, assistant clinical professor at the Loma Linda School of Medicine in California. "I may then put them on Wellbutrin instead, which actually helps with weight loss." If your meds are not to blame, seek out some workout buddies or a support group. "Attending meetings, like Weight Watchers, working out with a group of friends, or hiring a personal trainer in Chicago is a great way to increase social support," Dr. Needham says, "which can help depression."

Moody Wisdom: It's time to be real with yourself. You (and everyone else) is bombarded with negativity daily. Look at the ways it affects you and take the appropriate the steps while being mindful of your overall health. Medication can help but it's important to find the right one for you...which leads us to...

You're taking the wrong Rx


There's a long list of medications that can cause weight gain: If you're taking birth control pills, excess hormones for hormone therapy, steroids, beta-blockers for heart disease and blood pressure, anti-seizure meds, breast cancer medications like Tamoxifen, some treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, and even some migraine and heartburn medications, you may notice pounds creeping on.

"When I see patients who are concerned about weight gain, I start looking at their medications," says Steven D. Wittlin, MD. clinical director of the endocrine-metabolism division at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, NY. "That's a biggie. Some may affect appetite; some may affect metabolism." Others may simply make you feel better and thus regain your lost appetite.

Fix it: If you suspect your medication is affecting your waistline, your doctor may be able to find an alternative treatment that won't have that particular side effect.

Your gut is slow


Digestive issues, including slow bowel movements, may also account for excess pounds. "Ideally, you eat, and then, an hour or so later, you have a bowel movement," says Dr. Hedaya. "But once or twice a day is still in the healthy range." If you're not so regular, dehydration, medications, low fiber, or even a lack of good flora in your gut could be to blame.

Fix it: If constipation is your only symptom, then trying probiotics can help your digestive tract work properly. Staying hydrated is key, along with a diet chock-full of fiber-rich foods. But you can also try drinking a fiber powder, like Metamucil, mixed with water. "It may even grab fat globules in your intestinal tract as it scrubs out waste," says Dr. Hedaya. If you're still having trouble, check with your doctor to rule out a range of disorders, including hypothyroidism or a neurological issue.

Your body's missing certain nutrients


Being low in magnesium, iron or having a vitamin D deficiancy can compromise your immune system, sap your energy levels, or alter your metabolism in ways that make it harder to take healthy-lifestyle steps. "You may compensate for low energy with caffeine, sweets, and simple carbs," says Dr. Hedaya, "Or find that you feel too run down or weak to exercise."

Fix it: While you can try to boost your iron levels by eating red meat and spinach and increase magnesium by adding Brazil nuts or almonds to your diet, it's nearly impossible to consume enough milk or get enough sunlight to compensate for low vitamin D. "It's important to know that it could take awhile to find your right dose of vitamin D," says Dr. Hedaya. "If you take too much, you can get kidney stones. You need to have your blood tested every three months, so your doctor can make adjustments to the dose for you." Adding an iron supplement is a little less tricky—but it's still wise to let your doctor rule out hypothyroidism or other conditions that might cause insulin resistance, and thus weight gain, before you start taking supplements.

You're getting older


It's the one condition that's unavoidable. "Often, I hear patients tell me they think their metabolism is slowing down," says Dr. Fradin-Read. "This is real—we don't burn as many calories at 40 or 50 as we used to burn at 20. So we need more exercise—and less food—to keep metabolism going. Some studies show that exercise might be even more important than the diet for long-term weight maintenance."

Fix it: "Remember that all calories are not equal when it comes to weight," says Dr. Fradin-Read. "Eating lean protein will cause your body to burn calories more efficiently. On the other hand, carbs are something your body tends to burn more slowly and even store in your body more readily." Choosing low-fat proteins and reducing carbs are good ways to help avoid unnecessary pounds.

Moody Wisdom: A couple of notes here:

1. Exercise may be even more important than diet for long-term maintenance but.....your health will seriously derail without the proper diet. It's as simple as that.

2. I agree that low-fat proteins and reducing carbs can help avoid unnecessary pounds.....if those carbs are simple carbs. You absolutely need complex carbs (ie greens and other veggies) for optimal health. Also, advocating low-fat proteins doesn't mean that your diet is protein-focused or dominant. It is only a fraction of your needs and probably shouldn't exceed 24-40% of your dietary intake.

You have plantar fasciitis


"Many musculoskeletal conditions, including plantar fasciitis, but also osteoarthritis and knee or hip pain, can result in unintentional weight gain," says Donald Bohay, MD, cochairman of the public education committee for the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society. "Plantar fasciitis certainly can force you to cut back on your activity enough to cause weight gain."

Fix it: Modify your exercise program to swap biking or swimming in place of weight-bearing exercise, says Dr. Bohay. Seek out a physical therapist who can design an appropriate program for your specific needs—ask your doctor or check out the American Physical Therapy Association to find a qualified therapist in your area.

You have Cushing's Syndrome


Weight gain accompanied by high blood pressure, osteoporosis, and changes in your skin tone and quality, including purple or silvery stretch marks on your abdomen and ruddy cheeks, could be a sign that your body isn't processing nutrients the way it should, due to a cortisol-producing tumor on one of your adrenal glands. The syndrome affects only about 15 in every million adults annually, so proceed with caution before demanding a battery of tests. "Cushing's Syndrome is not terribly common," says Dr. Wittlin, "but one of the telltale signs is that your fat distribution is more in the midsection of your body, leaving your arms and legs looking more slender."

Fix it: If you suspect you are gaining weight that you can't attribute to your eating habits, medications, or lack of exercise, a few tests—including a blood test and urinalysis, to get an accurate check of your body's cortisol levels, will give your doctor the first clues to this condition. If the levels are deemed excessively high, then your doctor will order further tests, like a CT scan of your pituitary and adrenal glands, to determine if such a tumor exists. If the tumor is confirmed, doctors will likely perform surgery to remove the tumor (and possibly the affected gland), followed by a course of steroids to help regulate the remaining gland.

Moody Wisdom: Or you don't have Cushing's Syndrome. It's amazing how many personal training clients will blame their weight gain on a rare disease (and truly believe it) before changing the most common cause: Their diets. While being fully aware of your body is important, also be mindful of what you are avoiding. You should probably start by reading "50 Foods You Should Never Eat" Review.

What other weird reasons affect your waistline?

Are you having trouble attaining any level of weight loss success? Check out the list of tips and tricks in my post The 68 Best Ways to Lose Body Fat and More.

Picture Credit: Prevention.com-What's undermining your weight loss success on a scale? You might be surpised.

Article Credit:
Author: Michael Moody Fitness with excerpt sourced from the article " 7 Weird Reasons You're Gaining Weight " on Prevention.com.
"7 Weird Reasons You're Gaining Weight" Review
Learn how to lose weight from a personal trainer in Chicago.
 
 
Looking to reshape your life? Check out  Redefine Yourself  on Amazon today!

Looking to reshape your life? Check out Redefine Yourself on Amazon today!

"9 Strategies to Make Your Diet Resolutions Stick" Review

Are you having a hard time sticking to your resolutions? Check out the 6 tips I pulled from the Livestrong article "9 Strategies to Make Your Diet Resolutions Stick"":

1. Make It Personal


Setting a successful resolution isn’t just about what you want to accomplish, but why, on a personal level, it’s important for you to achieve your goal. “Research shows that intrinsic motivation is the key when it comes to those who can make a resolution and stick to it. Intrinsic motivation is that thing that drives someone to achieve something great. It is usually personal to them for their own reasons. For example, losing weight to improve your self-esteem is a personal motivation as opposed to losing weight because your family wants you to. Invest in resolutions that are personal to you,” says Misti Gueron M.S., RD, medical nutrition therapist at the Khalili Center. Whether it’s boosting your self-confidence or having more energy to play with your kids, determine your intrinsic motivation and write it down somewhere so that it will personally inspire you to stay on track.

2. Create a Plan for Success


“Diet resolutions are often short lived because our daily lives and social connections reflect our old habits. Many think that New Year’s resolutions will magically happen at the start of a new year or that their willpower will magically get them through the unexpected diversions. Taking a little time to plan and organize your physical and social environment will pay off in the long run,” says Misti Gueron M.S., RD. For example, if your resolution is to eat more fruits and vegetables, set a reminder on your phone to grocery shop at a set time each week and choose your favorite fruits and vegetables that are most convenient for your lifestyle. According to the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council poll, respondents said eating more healthy foods like blueberries is one of the easiest resolutions to keep, with nearly three quarters saying it would be really easy or pretty easy. Decide what healthy resolutions would be easiest and most enjoyable for you, then set a plan for success.

3. Home Not-So-Sweet Home


Rather than resolving to never eat a sweet again -- which would take a lot of effort and create a feeling of deprivation -- a more realistic resolution would be to create an environment in which you can consume fewer sweets without having to rely solely on your willpower. “Ridding your cupboards and freezer of all sweets is one easy and effective strategy that sticks when it comes to resolutions. Research shows that when sweets are within arm’s reach or even within our sight, we are much more likely to consume them than if we have to go out to the store to buy them,” says Misti Gueron, M.S., RD. If you don’t have total control over not having sweets in your home due to those you live with, be sure to store them in areas where you are least likely to see them and put healthier foods you like in eyesight.

4. Get in the Game


Gamification of weight loss is a strategy that most are not familiar with, and research is showing that this may be a successful way to achieve a New Year’s resolution when it comes to healthy eating, exercise and weight control. “Gamification of weight loss is when large groups of people are offered financial as well as other incentives to be involved in a competitive challenge with others. Grouping people together in an effort to encourage healthy habits can foster member camaraderie and commonality, challenge and excitement and furthered learning about getting healthier. In these scenarios, many individuals have gotten healthier, minimized or eradicated health problems and changed the course of their lives. Research shows that community support and a commonality among individuals trying to get healthier can foster healthy behavior change for the long term,” says Misti Gueron, M.S., RD.

5. Eat More Mindfully


One of the most important New Year’s resolutions to eating a healthy diet has nothing to do with what you’re eating and everything to do with how you’re eating. “Eat meals more mindfully: Remove physical distractions while you eat -- no phone, TV, book or newspaper -- and try to keep your focus on the actual eating experience (how the food tastes and what is going on in your mouth). It is natural that your attention will wander while you eat, but you want to bring it back to the food at least a few times throughout the meal to check in on whether you are still enjoying the food and whether or not you are still hungry. Being more mindful will enable you to enjoy your food more and enable you to stop eating when you are comfortably full rather than just when your plate is cleaned,” says Alyse Levine, M.S., RD.

6. Recruit Support


Who you surround yourself with is a critical component of your ability to reach and maintain your goals. “Research shows that without support among our friends, families and within our communities, we are much less likely to create healthy changes with our health and weight. Reaching new health goals is more successful within a supportive environment and with individuals of similar values,” says Misti Gueron, M.S., RD. Take a look at those in your life and make an effort to spend quality time with those that support and inspire you. “When you are feeling discouraged for not making it to the gym and your friend sends a text message that she is waiting for you on the treadmill, it is hard to throw the towel in on yourself and her,” adds Gueron.

What other strategies have helped you stick to your goals?

Picture Credit: LIVESTRONG.com - I love strawberries! What will be your "sweet" replacement?


Article Credit:
Author: Michael Moody Fitness with excerpt sourced from LIVESTRONG.com
"9 Strategies to Make Your Diet Resolutions Stick" Review
Learn how to lose weight from a personal trainer in Chicago.
 

"20 Weight Loss Tricks You Haven't Tried" Review

I've chosen the top 10 from the list on http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/weightloss/20-weight-loss-tricks-you-havent-tried/ar-CC1UYW#page=1.

1. Affirm Your Values




2. Treat Yourself Like a Good Kid




3. Take Small Risks




4. Tune in to Your Emotions




5. Clean Up Your Act




6. Make Healthy Food Convenient




7. Try Active Acts of Kindness




8. De-Motorize Your Life




9. Open the Blinds




10. Limit Your Options




Picture Credit: Eat This, Not That!-Should you analyze your plate?


Article Credit:
Author: Excerpt sourced from Eat This, Not That!
"10 Weight Loss Tricks You Haven't Tried" Review
Learn how to lose weight from a personal trainer in Chicago.