Healthy Choices

"The 7 Simplest, Easiest Ways to Lose More Weight, According to Science" Review

If you don't have time to incorporate every weight loss trick in the book, you may want to quickly look through this list (from the article The 7 Simplest, Easiest Ways to Lose More Weight, According to Science).

1. Trade the Treadmill for the Dumbbells


If you're in the personal trainer gym already, you might as well make sure you get the most out of every bead of sweat. And, according to 2015 research from the Harvard School of Public Health, that means strength training. In the study (which followed 10,500 healthy folks over the course of 12 years), those who spent 20 minutes per day performing resistance exercise were more successful in the fight against belly fat compared to those who spent equal time getting their cardio on. Researchers say that, unlike cardio, which burns the vast majority (if not all) of its calories during your workout, strength training causes you to burn calories even after you leave the gym – and hikes up your metabolic rate, thanks to an increase in lean muscle mass.

Meanwhile, if you already incorporate strength training (be it with body-weight moves, free weights or machines), increasing some facet of that training can be a difference-maker. "If, for you, strength training is only a once- or twice-a-week thing, increase frequency. If it's already a three- or four-times-per-week thing, increase intensity. If you've been doing the same routine for a while, add in some new, more challenging moves," says St. Louis-based certified strength and conditioning specialist Kourtney Thomas.

2. Turn Off the Lights (and Draw the Blinds)


This tried-and-true tip will help you catch more than ZZZ's. In one 2014 American Journal of Epidemiology study of more than 100,000 women, participants who slept in the darkest rooms were 21 percent less likely to be obese than those who slept in the lightest rooms.

Any light exposure at night (from your devices or just the sun shining through your windows a couple of hours before your wake-up time) can throw off your body's metabolic rhythms and influence your body's levels of hunger-regulating hormones to spur next-day overeating, according to researchers.

3. Stop Multitasking


It's time to stop priding yourself on your multitasking "skills." According to a comprehensive meta-analysis published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, eating while doing other things – like watching TV, playing Candy Crush on your phone or driving to work – results in downing significantly more food both during the meal at hand and throughout the rest of the day. (A 2015 study found that caloric intake more than doubled when people ate their prior meal while walking!)

That's because your brain isn't nearly as good at multitasking as you think it is, explains registered dietitian Wesley Delbridge, spokesman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "When you multitask while eating, your brain isn't fully aware of how your food tastes, how much you are eating and when you should be full," he says. "Focus on your meal and you'll automatically increase satiety."

Moody Wisdom: Still having trouble making this change? It may be time to look at the big picture...You may need to change your approach to life. Read "99 Ways to Redefine Yourself Today".

4. Balance Out Each Plate


Take a quick scan of your plate: Does it contain fiber-rich carbs, protein, and healthy fat? If it has all three, you're good to go, says Delbridge, who notes that you can avoid a lot of trouble – like insulin spikes, sugar crashes, and overeating – simply by combining those components at every meal. While carbohydrates are vital for a quick-hit of energy, fiber, fat and protein slow down digestion and the release of carbohydrates into your bloodstream to reduce hunger for hours on end.

The rule applies not just to meals, but also snacks. For instance, if you pair that apple with a stick of protein- and fat-containing peanut butter, you'll stay full a lot longer, and end up eating less throughout the day. Plus, research from the University of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign shows that by spreading your protein intake throughout the day (rather than eating the bulk of it at dinnertime, like most Americans do) you can build more lean, metabolic-boosting muscle.

Moody Wisdom: Use this Weight Loss Plate to guide your dietary choices, as well.

5. Get NEAT


An acronym for non-exercise activity thermogenesis, NEAT is simply the amount of calories that you burn doing things other than "exercising." It includes walking to the bank, standing in line at the supermarket, taking out the trash and even typing (although that last one doesn't burn many calories), and it's a determining factor in your ability to lose weight – even if you have a regular gym habit, Thomas says.

NEAT varies up to 2,000 calories per day between people, according to Mayo Clinic researchers, who note that simply standing or walking for two-and-a-half hours per day can close much of the NEAT gap between obese and lean individuals. That might sound like a lot of time, but even if you simply resolve to take all of your work calls standing up, you can go a long way toward hitting your goals, Delbridge says.

6. Get Social


Don't underestimate the buddy system. "Being accountable to and getting support from someone else makes an amazing difference in people's ability to stick with their weight-loss efforts and be successful," Delbridge says. And even after losing the weight, women who receive social support from others are consistently more likely to maintain their weight loss compared to those who try to do it alone, according to research published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics.

Don't feel comfortable having regular check-ins or working out with your friends or family? Try getting online. Join a weight-loss group on Facebook, reach out anonymously on Reddit or post all of your meals or workouts to Instagram.

7. Use Smaller Plates


If you've never heard of the "small plate" trick, now's the time to start digging through your cupboard. Plate size has a greater impact on the amount of food you eat than most people realize. According to research from the Cornell Food and Brand Lab, when people use large, 12-inch plates, they serve themselves 52 percent more food and eat 45 percent more than people who use small and slim, 9-inch plates.

Worried that you'll just wind up going back for seconds? Don't be. Even if you put the same amount of food on a small plate as you would a large one, it will look like it contains more food, per researchers. And, as a result, you'll actually feel fuller than you would had you used your jumbo plates.

What other simple ways do you suggest to achieve easy weight loss?

Are you having trouble losing weight? Read "50 Unhealthiest Foods on the Planet" Review. It's probably time to rewrite your grocery list.

Picture Credit: MSN.com-How can you change your "desk approach" to lose weight?

Article Credit:
Author: Michael Moody Fitness with excerpt sourced from the article " The 7 Simplest, Easiest Ways to Lose More Weight, According to Science " on MSN.com.
"The 7 Simplest, Easiest Ways to Lose More Weight, According to Science" Review
Learn how to lose weight from a personal trainer in Chicago.
 
What are you waiting for? Create the life you want today with Michael's  self help book Redefine Yourself . Find it on  Amazon !

What are you waiting for? Create the life you want today with Michael's self help book Redefine Yourself. Find it on Amazon!

 

"4 Signs You May Be Eating Too Much Protein" Review

How do you know if you're eating too much protein? You may be experiencing one or more of these symptoms (and not realize it)...sorry Dr. Atkins (from the article 4 Signs You May Be Eating Too Much Protein).

1. You’re Gaining Weight


If you increase your protein intake without decreasing other foods in your diet, you’ll have an excess of protein and calories. And if you have a sedentary lifestyle and eat excess protein — or excess anything — you will gain weight.

Moody Wisdom: Increasing your protein to lose weight (especially animal protein) sounds great in theory....who doesn't love meat on a grill (and it's nutritional makeup helps you build muscle). It's time to jump off the Atkins train, though: Animal protein WILL NOT help you lose weight. More nutrient dense (and less inflammatory) options are waiting for you, instead. You should read 26 Weight Loss Myths You Shouldn't Believe for other suprises too.

2. You’re Dehydrated


Excess protein is filtered out of your body by your kidneys. A by-product of protein metabolism is nitrogen. The kidneys use water to flush out the nitrogen, which creates a dehydrating effect. When you decrease carbs, your body retains less fluid as well.

3. You’re Having Digestive Issues


Have nausea, indigestion, diverticulitis or constipation? When you increase meat, fish, chicken, cheese and other dairy on a high-protein diet and don’t eat enough fiber, the kidneys use excess water to rid your body of nitrogen and you can develop constipation.

Too much protein also puts a strain on your digestive enzymes, which can lead to digestive issues.

4. You’ve Got Bad Breath and Headaches


In a diet low in carbs with increased protein and fat, your body may go into a state of ketosis. In ketosis, your body is burning fat for fuel instead of carbs. Bad breath and headaches are a side effect of ketosis.

The biggest potential problem with following a high-protein diet is that you may not be getting enough fiber, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, all of which are found in vegetables and fruits.

Moody Wisdom: You may experience frequent headaches for a number of reasons, including dehydration. More likely than not, it's stemming from something in your diet. Any time you experience this symptom, take note of your dietary choices: The culprit may lie on your plate.

So what can you do? Switch some of your protein sources to plant-based proteins, which will then provide you with these other needed nutrients.

Here are some higher-protein plant sources:


Beans (1 cup = 15 grams)

Lentils (1/2 cup cooked = 9 grams)

Quinoa (1 cup cooked = 8 grams)

Buckwheat (1 cup cooked = 6 grams)

Almonds (1/4 cup = 4 grams)

Sunflower seeds (1/4 cup = 6 grams)

Peanut butter (2 tablespoons = 8 grams)

Almond butter (2 tablespoons = 7 grams)

Spinach (1 cup cooked = 5 grams)

Hemp seed (3 tablespoons = 11 grams)

(Source: USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference)

Keep in mind that all plant-based sources of protein don’t have all of the essential amino acids your body needs like animal proteins do. But if you eat a variety of whole foods throughout the day, you’ll likely get all the amino acids that you need.

What other weird reasons affect your waistline?

Are you having trouble losing weight? Read "50 Unhealthiest Foods on the Planet" Review. It's probably time to rewrite your grocery list.

Picture Credit: Livestrong.com-Is your protein intake underminingweight loss?

Article Credit:
Author: Michael Moody Fitness with excerpt sourced from the article " 4 Signs You May Be Eating Too Much Protein " on Livestrong.com.
"4 Signs You May Be Eating Too Much Protein" Review
Learn how to lose weight from a personal trainer in Chicago.
 
Transform your life today. Find Michael's  self improvement book  Redefine Yourself on  Amazon .

Transform your life today. Find Michael's self improvement book Redefine Yourself on Amazon.

 

"6 Things You Can Do Every Day to Prevent Weight Gain" Review

Here's a quick list of ways to prevent weight gain daily. It's helped my personal training clients lose weight and will definitely help you too (from the article 6 Things You Can Do Every Day to Prevent Weight Gain).

Save yoga pants for yoga


Wearing leggings when you're not down dogging is comfy, yes, but a bad habit to get into. The stretchy fabric and elastic waistband are so forgiving that you'll have no idea if your waist is expanding. Save the spandex for your sessions with a Chicago personal trainer and opt for something more structured like a pair of jeans or a fitted dress so you can keep tabs on your waistline.

Fiber, and more of it


Fiber has the ability to fill you up for hours. Include at least eight grams at every meal and three to four at every snack to help you reach a goal of 25 to 30 grams a day. Nosh on fruits, veggies, nuts, and seeds and you'll have no problem getting your fill.

Moody Wisdom: Add beans and seeds to every meal for a nutritional punch: protein, fiber, the good fat, and more! Need ideas? Find more fiber options in my article How to Lose Weight Without Exercise.

30 minutes, at least


Get in the habit of moving daily. Aim for at least a half hour, with four to five days devoted to more rigorous or longer workouts, and two to three days a more moderate workout like walking, hiking, or stretching. Be sure to include strength training with weights since building muscle helps you burn calories faster. If you don't have time, studies show that even 15 minutes proves beneficial.

Moody Wisdom: We're meant to move every day. Unfortunately, our sedentary lifestyles keep us locked onto a chair. Make a point to at least walk more.

Eat one every day


Make one meal of the day a big, huge salad to fill up on fiber without a ton of calories. Include a variety of greens and fresh veggies in your salad along with a low-fat protein source like cooked beans to make it even more filling, plus avocado or sunflower seeds to add healthy fats. Ensure you eat one salad every day by making a week's worth all at once.

Moody Wisdom: Every salad doesn't have to be the same. In fact, it should be a great balance of different vegetables (not just leafy greens). Read my recent post to see why salads can be overrated.

Chocolate, alcohol, or french fries


Cravings only grow stronger with time, so keep them at bay by giving in to them! Indulging a little every day will settle those cravings, so you can move on and stay committed to your healthy diet. The key, though, is to enjoy a small taste and to be done. Don't let a little indulging turn into a week of eating whatever you want.

Moody Wisdom: Hmmmmmmm....a little every day will settle those cravings? Maybe. Your success doing this will depend on your emotional connection to the food (and your self-control). I love chocolate and have faced the truth: If there's chocolate in front of me, I will eat it....I will eat all of it! Sometimes you're better off staying away from the treats at home and only indulging at social events every once in awhile. It might be the strategy you need to finally lose weight and/or keep it off.

Don't forget that sometimes the small things make the biggest difference too. Take a look at the post 25 Awful Ingredients Everyone Still Uses—But Shouldn’t! to find what.

Have a bedtime


Research shows those who are sleep-deprived tend to eat hundreds of calories more, not just because they're awake longer, but because sleep affects levels of hunger-regulating hormones.

Feeling tired makes you more likely to reach for sugary pick-me-ups. Get to bed at the same time every night (even on weekends), and set your alarm for the next day, making sure to get between seven and nine hours of sleep.

As a bonus, the extra energy will allow you to hit your a.m. personal training session with intensity, instead of hitting the snooze button and skipping out.

Moody Wisdom: Hands down (or heads down in this case), sleep is important no matter the goal. Having trouble sleeping? Check out the article Improving Your Sleep.
What else can you do to prevent weight gain?

Are you having trouble attaining any level of weight loss success? Check out the list of tips and tricks in my post The 68 Best Ways to Lose Body Fat and More.

Picture Credit: Bonappetit.com/GENTL AND HYERS ©2015-Will beans help you prevent weight gain?

Article Credit:
Author: Michael Moody Fitness with excerpt sourced from the article " 6 Things You Can Do Every Day to Prevent Weight Gain " on MSN.com.
"6 Things You Can Do Every Day to Prevent Weight Gain" Review
Learn how to lose weight from a personal trainer in Chicago.
 

"70 Most Popular Sodas Ranked by How Toxic They Are" Review

Still indulging in pop/soda while trying to lose weight with your personal trainer in Chicago? I've stripped down a recent list I found to give you the 10 worst sodas (from the article 70 Most Popular Sodas Ranked by How Toxic They Are). See if your favorite liquid waistline killer is on it!

10. DR. BROWN'S ROOT BEER


12 fl oz, 170 calories, 42 g carbs, 42 g sugar

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Caramel Color, Natural And Artificial Flavors, Sodium Benzoate (Preservative), Gum Acacia, Citric Acid, Caffeine Free

You know when you add some Mentos to a two-liter Diet Coke and the whole thing explodes? (Don’t try that at home.) That’s thanks to the Gum Acacia in the candy, which also in this soda—it’s a natural emulsifier. Despite it’s weird name, is probably this most natural ingredient in this sugar juice.

9. DR. BROWN’S CREAM SODA


12 fl oz, 180 calories, 44 g carbs, 44 g sugar

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Natural And Artificial Flavors, Sodium Benzoate (Preservative), Citric Acid, Caramel Color.

With more calories than a Mountain Dew (though with less artificial colors, thus its better ranking), this Cream would have made even Prince blush.

7. MOUNTAIN DEW—TIE


12 fl oz, 170 calories, 46 g carbs, 46 g sugar

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Concentrated Orange Juice, Citric Acid, Natural Flavor, Sodium Benzoate (Preserves Freshness), Caffeine, Sodium Citrate, Erythorbic Acid (Preserves Freshness), Gum Arabic, Calcium Disodium EDTA (To Protect Flavor), Brominated Vegetable Oil, Yellow 5

There's flame retardant in your Mountain Dew. That soda with the lime-green hue (and other citrus-flavored bubbly pops) won't keep your insides fireproof, but it does contain brominated vegetable oil, a patented flame retardant for plastics that has been banned in foods throughout Europe and in Japan. Brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, which acts as an emulsifier in citrus-flavored soda drinks, is found in about 10 percent of sodas sold in the U.S. “After a few extreme soda binges - not too far from what many [video] gamers regularly consume - a few patients have needed medical attention for skin lesions, memory loss and nerve disorders, all symptoms of overexposure to bromine,” according to an article in Environmental News.

7. MOUNTAIN DEW CODE RED—TIE


12 fl oz, 170 calories, 46 g carbs, 46 g sugar

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Orange Juice Concentrate, Citric Acid, Sodium Hexametaphosphate, Sodium Benzoate, Natural Flavor, Caffeine, Sodium Citrate, Gum Arabic, Calcium Disodium EDTA, Red 40, Brominated Vegetable Oil, Yellow 5, Blue 1

As we said, Europe and Japan have already banned the flame retardant brominated vegetable oil (BVO) out of their bubbly beverages. Code Red!

6. A&W ROOT BEER


12 fl oz, 180 calories, 46 g carbs, 46 g sugar

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup and/or Sugar, Caramel Color, Sodium Benzoate (preservative), Natural and Artificial Flavors

You gotta love that ingredients list: This American classic might have sugar and HFCS. Throw in two scoops of vanilla ice cream to make a Root Beer float and you have more than two day’s worth of sugar in one chilled mug.

5. MUG CREAM SODA


12 fl oz, 180 calories, 47 g carbs, 47 g sugar

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Sodium Benzoate (Preserves Freshness), Citric Acid, Caramel Color, Calcium Disodium EDTA (to protect flavor)

Speaking of cream, you’d have to down 12 servings of Redi-Whip to equal the calorie count of Mug Cream Soda (distributed by Pepsi)—and would still need to eat 12 Hershey’s Kisses on top of that to equal the sugar count.

4. A&W CREAM SODA


12 fl oz, 180 calories, 48 g carbs, 48 g sugar

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup and/or Sugar, Sodium Benzoate (preservative), Natural and Artificial Flavors, Caramel Color, Citric Acid, Flavored with Vanilla Extract, Caffeine.

A&W traffics heavily in the nostalgia of the roadside restaurant—the company created the nation’s first chain of them in 1923. But their cream soda is a car crash of HFCS and artificial colors and flavors. This is not your grandparent’s soda, in the worst way possible.

3. DR. BROWN’S BLACK CHERRY


12 fl oz, 180 calories, 45 g carbs, 45 g sugar

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Cherry And Other Natural Flavors, Citric Acid, Caramel Color, Sodium Benzoate (Preservative), and Artificial Color (Red 40)

With just one less gram of sugar than Stewart’s Black Cherry, Dr. Brown’s Black Cherry would horrify most doctors—and not just because of the sugar. Like Stewart's—and many of the colored sodas here—this one has the artificial color Red 40, which is it ranks lower than our next entry, despite having less sugar. Don’t get down with Brown.

2. STEWART'S BLACK CHERRY WISHNIAK


12 fl oz, 190 calories, 46 g carbs, 46 g sugar

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Natural and Artificial Flavor, Citric Acid, Sodium Benzoate, Caramel Color, Red 40, Blue 1

With more sugar than seven Chewy Chips Ahoy cookies, Stewart's Black Cherry would be a “Not That!” because of the sweetness alone—it’s the most caloric on this list. And, like many of the soda on this list, it also contains caramel coloring. This additive wouldn't be dangerous if you made it the old-fashioned way—with water and sugar, on top of a stove. But the food industry follows a different recipe: They treat sugar with ammonia, which can produce some nasty carcinogens. A Center for Science in the Public Interest report asserted that the high levels of caramel color found in soda account for roughly 15,000 cancers in the U.S. annually.

1. FANTA GRAPE


12 fl oz, 180 calories, 48 g carbs, 48 g sugar

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Natural Flavors, Tartaric Acid, Potassium Sorbate and Sodium Benzoate (to Protect Taste), Citric Acid, Red 40, Blue 1

Liquefy a bag of Skittles and you’d still have to add 6 grams of sugar to equal the sweetness of this can of corn syrup, citric acid and artificial colors. In fact, that bag of Skittles has the exact same ingredients, including Red 40, which Canadian researchers found to be contaminated with known carcinogens. Even without its unsettling origin story—the Coca-Cola company created Fanta to profit in Germany when Nazis forbid the importation of USA-made Coke—this would still be the absolute worst soda in America!

What other foods or drinks are affecting your weight loss? Check out my post 20 Coffee Drinks with More Sugar Than a Can of Coke for other liquid waistline killers.

Are you having trouble attaining any level of weight loss success? Check out the list of tips and tricks in my post The 68 Best Ways to Lose Body Fat and More.

Picture Credit: MSN.com and Eat This! Not That!-Should you "Do the Dew" while trying to lose weight?

Article Credit:
Author: Michael Moody Fitness with excerpt sourced from the article " 70 Most Popular Sodas Ranked by How Toxic They Are " on MSN.com.
"70 Most Popular Sodas Ranked by How Toxic They Are" Review
Learn how to lose weight from a personal trainer in Chicago.
 

"25 Awful Ingredients Everyone Still Uses—But Shouldn’t!" Review

Sammy and I have removed these ingredients from our weight loss kitchen and you should too. Check out this unbelievable list....it will ignite the fire under your body fat (from the article "25 Awful Ingredients Everyone Still Uses—But Shouldn’t!")!

1. CHEAP VEGETABLE OILS


Cheap oils like soybean, corn oil, and cottonseed oil are highly processed, contain high amounts of pro-inflammatory omega-6 saturated fats, and offer very little heart-healthy omega-3s. Instead of using these fats in your cooking, switch to avocado or coconut oil, which have both been shown to aid weight loss. Both oils have high smoke points, too, so they're great options for pan-frying.

Moody Wisdom: Let's be honest, all oils are mostly fat and highly processed. Use water when stir frying your vegetables, properly season your pans to reduce sticking, or lightly wipe oil on your pan instead.

2. CREAM OF SOMETHING SOUP


It’s amazing how many nutritious, promising dishes get ruined once someone decides to throw it all in a casserole dish and then drench it in a canned cream-of-chicken/mushroom/whatever. Vegetable oil, MSG, and more than 1,600 milligrams of sodium per cup—nope, not appetizing. If you’ve gotta use an ingredient like this, at least opt for an organic variety, like Amy’s Kitchen.

Moody Wisdom: Make your own "cream of something" with almond milk instead.

3. MARGARINE


"Some margarine tubs contain heart-harming trans fats and are made with processed oils that may be pro-inflammatory,” says Isabel Smith, MS RD CDN, founder of Isabel Smith Nutrition. Inflammation has been directly tied to obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

4. HEAVY CREAM


As much as we are telling you to avoid trusting all non- and low-fat foods, we’re not about to give a green light to something like heavy cream. Loaded with calories—about 50 per tablespoon or 800 per cup—heavy cream is basically a ticket on the fastest, non-stop train to Fatville.

5. FOOD COLORING


"Artificial food dyes, which many people use to color baked goods, are cause for concern and may have serious side effects—especially in children,” says Jay Cardiello, diet expert and personal trainer to the stars. “Red 40, for example, may contain cancer-causing contaminants, despite the fact that it's approved by the FDA. The dye may also be a potential trigger to hyperactivity in children. Instead, color your dishes with natural sources of color like beet juice, red cabbage or paprika."

6. FATTY GROUND BEEF


Studies show that eating the right cuts of steak can help whittle your middle. But fatty cuts can have the opposite effect. In fact, they’ve been positively associated with belly fat and larger waist circumference in lab studies. Use 80% lean beef or better to keep your metabolism stoked and your heart healthy.

Moody Wisdom: Still sounds too good to be true? It is. Don't kid yourself....the more red meat in your diet, the higher chance of inflammation and belly fat (despite the claim above). The moral of the weight loss story here: Choose leaner options if you must eat meat.

7. ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS


"Although they don't contribute calories, artificial sweeteners are up to 700 times sweeter than natural sugar—and often leave you craving more sweets later in the day,” says Alissa Rumsey, MS, RD. If you're trying to cut calories from your baked goods, swap out sugar for unsweetened applesauce instead.

8. BLEACHED FLOUR


Cardiello warns everyone to watch out for all-purpose flour that's been bleached. “Although it may give your food a nicer color and help you to create baked goods that are more soft and tender, the bleach chemicals may be harmful to your health."

9. WHITE RICE


Not only is white rice one of the worst carbs ever, it’s too-easily substituted to be tolerated! Barley, quinoa, and wildrice are all better bets for your waistline and are just as delicious—but more satisfying—with your culinary concoctions.

10. FAT-FREE DAIRY PRODUCTS


"Although I'm a fan of fat-free milk, other fat-free dairy products like cheese, cream cheese, and cottage cheese are a no-go in my kitchen,” reports Christine M. Palumbo, MBA, RDN, FAND. “Many people find the texture, taste and mouthfeel of these products to be less satisfying, which either turns them off from the dish altogether or spurs cravings for seconds and thirds as they search for satisfaction."

Moody Wisdom: All dairy may increase inflammation or cause digestive issues. I'm well aware of the tastiness of cheese, etc. If you eat it, go for the real thing but less of it.

11. CONVENTIONAL PASTA


Sorry, pasta lovers, but the bulk of your pasta bowl is likely filled with refined wheat and is void of fiber and protein (two vital weight loss nutrients). Thankfully, there are some healthy alternatives that won’t give you a bloated belly and nutrition-lacking headache. Black bean pasta, Banza chickpea pasta, and zucchini noodles (AKA zoodles) are healthier options packed with things like fiber and protein that your body can use for sustained energy.

12. CONVENTIONAL PEANUT BUTTER


"Conventional peanut butter is filled with fully or partially hydrogenated oils, which are basically trans fats,” Smith advises. “Whether you're making peanut butter cookies or a Thai peanut sauce, use natural peanut butter that contains nothing more than peanuts and salt.”

13. CERTAIN MILK ALTERNATIVES


Although it's derived from a natural source, carrageenan—often found in almond milk—can be destructive to the digestive system. “It can trigger an immune response that causes inflammation, gut irritation and lesions, and even cancer,” shares Gina Hassick, RD, LDN, CDE. “While organic foods ban the use of GMOs, chemical pesticides, and toxic synthetic additives, carrageenan is currently still allowed—so it's important to check food labels."

14. FLAVORED YOGURT


Sometimes 'healthy' desserts or smoothie recipes call for flavored yogurt. However, reduced-fat flavored yogurts are not a health food. “Did you know that one container of flavored yogurt can have more sugar than a candy bar?! It's true!” says Cassie Bjork, RD, LD of Healthy Simple Life. “When you remove the fat from a naturally fatty food like yogurt, you have to make up for the taste by adding sugar—or worse, artificial sweeteners.”

15. CORN & SIMPLE SYRUPS


If a recipe calls for corn or simple syrup, use maple syrup or honey instead. “While the former sugars are highly processed and contain little nutritional value, the latter options have antioxidants and antibacterial properties, all while providing the sweetness you're looking for,” Smith says.

16. FAT-FREE DRESSING


Like other low- or non-fat foods that must overcompensate with a bucket of bad stuff, fat-free dressings are often with sugar, salt and artificial ingredients you wouldn't find in your kitchen. There is such a thing as healthy fats. In fact, Palumbo explains that “having a little fat with your vegetables can help you absorb more of the nutrients and antioxidants.”

17. CANNED VEGGIES


What separates a healthy green bean from a not-so-healthy one? About three aisles in the grocery store! First, there’s the issue of cans most likely being lined with BPA. And then there’s the fact that many canned vegetables have excess salt and “flavor enhancers” like MSG, which, even in small doses, can cause stomach aches and indigestion. Just a half cup of canned cut green beans contains 380-390 mg of sodium—that’s more salt than you’ll find in a snack-size bag of Doritos! Switch to frozen or fresh to give your pot a healthy makeover.

18. CANNED FRUIT


Canned fruit might seem like an easy shortcut, but it’s just a quick route to belly fat. It’s packed with syrup — upwards of 20 grams of sugars a can! — and nasty additives such as artificial flavorings. Even unsweetened fruit in its own juice is a nutritional miss: Peeled fruit is missing crucial fiber, and vitamin content can degrade in the canning process. If having fresh fruit around the house is impractical, go for frozen—it’s often more nutritious than fresh fruit because it’s picked and frozen at its peak and the ice crystals (like on the skin of blueberries) can even help your body absorb more nutrients.

19. FULL-SODIUM BROTH


Broth is such a basic staple to so many people and often a little boring in taste that many people don’t give it that much thought. But one cup of full-sodium chicken broth can have more than 800 mg of blood-pressure-raising salt. That’s like three orders of large french fries from McDonalds! Low-sodium and unsalted broths are the way to go if you want to ward off water retention and stop belly bloat.

20. BOUILLON CUBES


Another overlooked, unassuming broth-esque item, the bouillon cube is like a tiny, rectangular trap. Monosodium glutamate (better known as MSG), Yellow 5, and Yellow 6 are just three of the unsettling ingredients found in a typical bouillon cube. The former has been shown to stimulate appetite while the latter two, both artificial coloring agents, may have adverse effects on activity and attention in children.

21. EGG BEATER-ESQUE PRODUCTS


"Eggs that come out of a container are not a health food,” says Dana James CDN, a nutritionist from Food Coach NYC. “This kind of product is processed so much that makers have to add in synthetic vitamins to boost its nutrient density. This is as far removed from a natural egg as you can get."

22. JUICE


From smoothies to soups, there are more recipes that call for juice than you might think. It’s usually an easy hack to amp up flavor profiles, but it’s not a smart trick. Steer clear of the excess sugar and calories by avoiding those recipes.

23. TURKEY BACON


There’s no denying it: Bacon can make anything taste ten times better. But if you think you’re making the healthy choice by opting for the turkey variety over the pig, you’ve got things all wrong. Though turkey bacon has about 13 fewer calories per slice, it’s higher in sodium—not great news if you have high blood pressure. Plus, pork offers more protein and heart-healthy monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAS) than its poultry-based counterpart. Bear in mind that no matter which option you add to your dish, serving size still matters—so don't pig out.

24. SAUSAGE


Mmm, mmm, mmm! Italian sausage is so tasty in so many things! But unfortunately, most sausage links are the opposite of diet-friendly. The reason: The majority of their calories come from fat and to make matters worse, many links are laced with appetite-boosting MSG.

Moody Wisdom: Choose the Jalepeno Chicken Sausage from Trader Joes...the best stats I've seen for a sausage yet.

25. SUGAR


Believe it or not, it’s fairly common for non-dessert foods to get a spoonful of sugar—which, if you’re anything like your fellow citizens, is the last thing your body needs. According to the CDC Americans eat a whopping 82 grams of added sugar a day—which is 37 grams above the recommended intake! Most people don't realize the amount of sugar in their coffee too. Check out 20 Coffee Drinks with More Sugar Than a Can of Coke.

What other awful ingredients should you remove from your kitchen?

Are you having trouble attaining any level of weight loss success? Check out the list of tips and tricks in my post The 68 Best Ways to Lose Body Fat and More.

Picture Credit: MSN.com-Are you willing to give up flour to lose weight?

Article Credit:
Author: Michael Moody Fitness with excerpt sourced from the article " 25 Awful Ingredients Everyone Still Uses—But Shouldn’t! " on MSN.com.
"25 Awful Ingredients Everyone Still Uses—But Shouldn’t!" Review
Learn how to lose weight from a personal trainer in Chicago.